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A taste of Western Sydney’s music scene

Sydney, and particularly its West-end is becoming a thriving and evolving hub of talented musicians, fulfilling musical appetites with a diversity of ...
Sydney, and particularly its West-end is becoming a thriving and evolving hub of talented musicians, fulfilling musical appetites with a diversity of genres that matches its diversity of people. 

Don’t sleep on our Western Sydney and local Sydney artists, otherwise, you’ll be missing out on some great tracks that’ll keep you through the dreadful shuttle bus rides to your classes, or even better, finding parking at Parramatta South campus. Allow editors Dania Roumieh and Jostina Basta to take you on a melodic journey through Western Sydney’s music scene, giving you a unique taste of some of their artists. Get your iTunes or Spotify app ready to download some fresh new tracks, infused with some sweet and soulful R&B, and a mix of energetic and lively hip-hop, rap, and afro-beats.

Thandiwe Gudu. 22. Zimbabwean & South African.
@thqndi

Photo supplied by Thandiwe Gudu.
Have a listen to:
1. HUNNY
2. DEMONS
3. On The Table
What got you into the music scene? 

“My dad’s a musician, so music has always been a huge part of my life, and it’s been only natural for me to continue making music into adulthood. I’ve honestly been writing music, singing and performing since I was a kid. So when I finished high school I jumped right into any opportunity that came my way and in 2019 I decided to pursue a career as a solo artist.”

How would you best describe your music style?

“My music style is hugely influenced by Old School Soul, R&B and Hip-Hop genres. I like to take elements of Old School composition and put my own spin on it, and some electronic elements.”

What are the top 3 artists that you get your inspiration from? 

“Today, I’d say Erykah Badu, Alicia Keys and Anderson Paak.”

What do you hope to see in the Western Sydney music scene in the next 5 years?

“I’d like to see a thriving R&B and Hip-Hop scene that celebrates the diversity and real talent of what’s on offer – not just tokenistic diversity. I’d also like to see more opportunities for the many artists on the come up. There’s so much amazing underground music yet to be embraced by the wider community. I feel like so many people aren’t aware of all the damn good sh*t coming out of this country!”

Eugene Yaw Obeng. 23. Ghanian.
@yaw.doesitall

Photo supplied by Eugene Yaw Obeng.
Have a listen to:
1. Get it
2. ARMADILLO
3. Free Zone

What got you into the music scene? 

“Music and performance have always been a dream, but I started off taking photos for some local artists and, with that, got closer to the music.”

How would you best describe your music style?

“My music is eclectic and ever-evolving, and at its heart, it is filled with bright energy, flowery production, and witty lyricism that creates a progressive hip hop fusion sound.”

What are the top 3 artists that you get your inspiration from? 

“Tyler the creator, Kojey Radical and Brent Faiyaz.”

What do you hope to see in the Western Sydney music scene in the next 5 years?

“I think the audience needs to pay attention to all forms of art coming out. I think because we’re new, it’s easier for people to jump on waves and trends but I will love to see people listening through the sound and supporting those who have been around keeping the scene alive. There’s a lot of talent going to waste cos, not enough support is coming from the people around. And that’s to say we’re as important as their favourite international emcee’s. With this- I think we’ll be good.”

Kwame Agyeman. 29. Ghanian.
@therealchanje

Photo supplied by Kwame Agyeman.
Have a listen to:
1. PASSENGER
What got you into the music scene? 

“I actually didn’t start making music until 2 years ago. I’ve been an MC pretty much all my life, been all around Australia hosting clubs – Marquee, Ivy, Trademark, The Club. I was doing big shows, like Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, The Game, Tory Lanez … it was good until I lost my way during those times”

Change adds “it wasn’t until I found my faithful life, and that’s where music came in. It’s all about telling people how great God is, through clothing, fashion, music and arts”

How would you best describe your music style?

“I don’t really have a genre, although I love hip hop and afro-beats. I’m very versatile with my sound.”

What are the top 3 artists that you get your inspiration from? 

“Guvna B, KB and Lacrea – all Christian artists”

“I think it’s a whole lot harder to be rapping about faith, but when it comes to secular music, you can rap about anything”. Nonetheless, Chanje adds that “the Lord finds ways to bring new ideas to stay creative the more you tap into him, the holy spirit and your faith”

What do you hope to see in the Western Sydney music scene in the next 5 years?

“I want to see revival, I want to see people’s lives getting changed, people getting off the streets, see the world helping each other to grow,” says Chanje.

Chanje emphasises his desire to see a revival in the music scene, sending faith-led messages that help support, build and edify others. Following the devastating effects of COVID-19, particularly mental health issues, Chanje ultimately hopes that such music will allow them to tap into living a righteous life.

Laani Jansen. 21. Sri-Lankan & Dutch
@laanij

Photo supplied by Laani Jansen.
Have a listen to:
1. SURRENDER 
What got you into the music scene? 

“My Dad was a big musician in Sri Lanka and continued music when he came to Australia, so I’ve been immersed in music from a young age and I’ve just loved it as long as I can remember.”

How would you best describe your music style?

“I find it hard to describe my music style because I like so many styles but I’d say I mostly sing soul/R&B music as well as pop/punk.”

What are the top 3 artists that you get your inspiration from? 

“My top 3 artists would have to be Harry Styles, Brendon Urie and Christina Aguilera.”

What do you hope to see in the Western Sydney music scene in the next 5 years?

“Well I hope to put out my own music into the Western Sydney music scene soon but I’d love to see more of the older R&B style resurface. It would also be cool to see more people making it from this area, I feel like it’s really hard to get big in the industry when you aren’t from America but things are changing slowly.”

Check out the recommended songs and music on our Spotify playlist!