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WSU is sleeping on its stars

The Western Sydney University observatory needs your support by Julia Bell...

The observatory contains a 30 year old telescope that was designed at the university, using concave mirrors to reflect the light and show students the celestial bodies they study. The software used to operate the telescope and view the images was designed by a master’s student at the university. This observatory has been labour of love from day one, as this incredible resource gives the university opportunities gives WSU students a unique access to an incredible resource.’ 

Ain De Horta, the Principal Astronomer of the observatory, runs an elective The Cosmos in Perspective: Information and Life during the autumn semester open to every degree. This subject includes practical activities at the observatory in Werrington, so if you want to see the dome roof of the building open, allowing us to see the stars up close while studying the origins of the universe, this is the elective for you.  

The observatory is currently not open to the public, but students and staff alike hope it will be again. Before the pandemic, the observatory hosted an amateur astronomy group for students and local enthusiasts and was open for school excursions and families to tour. Increasing student engagement at this incredible building through Western Life events and the enrollment in its elective is the best way to show the university that it is not forgotten.  

On the 7th of May the Science Society held a movie night in the observatory to watch Hidden Figures.  This was one of many events held by the Science Society, including pizza nights and liquid nitrogen ice cream. Be sure to watch out on Western Life, Facebook and Instagram to stay up to date on what’s happening.  

The Western Sydney University Observatory sits on an unused campus in Werrington, where it was once filled with students and astronomers.  

The observatory contains a 30 year old telescope that was designed at the university, using concave mirrors to reflect the light and show students the celestial bodies they study. The software used to operate the telescope and view the images was designed by a master’s student at the university. This observatory has been labour of love from day one, as this incredible resource gives the university opportunities gives WSU students a unique access to an incredible resource.’ 

Ain De Horta, the Principal Astronomer of the observatory, runs an elective The Cosmos in Perspective: Information and Life during the autumn semester open to every degree. This subject includes practical activities at the observatory in Werrington, so if you want to see the dome roof of the building open, allowing us to see the stars up close while studying the origins of the universe, this is the elective for you.  

The observatory is currently not open to the public, but students and staff alike hope it will be again. Before the pandemic, the observatory hosted an amateur astronomy group for students and local enthusiasts and was open for school excursions and families to tour. Increasing student engagement at this incredible building through Western Life events and the enrollment in its elective is the best way to show the university that it is not forgotten.  

On the 7th of May the Science Society held a movie night in the observatory to watch Hidden Figures.  This was one of many events held by the Science Society, including pizza nights and liquid nitrogen ice cream. Be sure to watch out on Western Life, Facebook and Instagram to stay up to date on what’s happening.  

Image Credit: Sandy Lindsay